Snapping away the school holidays with Foto iwi programme

The school holidays are just around the corner and if you have some young creatives in your home, signing them up to a Foto iwi school holiday programme could be money well spent.

Foto iwi is bringing creativity into our communities, offering photography workshops again these holidays for kids aged 10 and up, says photographer and Foto iwi co-founder Shayne Jeffares.

“These ones are a little different. These action packed workshops are based around four different local attractions that offer up close and behind the scenes opportunities for creating great photographs.”

The students will meet up, kit up and go off to their shoots, supported by the Foto iwi team.

 

Foto iwi students get ready to roll

 

“The great thing with Foto iwi creative workshops is that it gives kids opportunities to express their world through a camera’s perspective.

“They are encouraged to slow down, be mindful and look beyond the shot.”

The Foto iwi team help each student to learn the basics including camera settings, changes in light in different settings and the rule of thirds, Shayne says. He believes it is important for the students to be able to bring their own creativity to each workshop and to enjoy the process rather than focus on the image.

“I am always amazed at how talented these kids are. Foto iwi has always been about finding your sense of belonging, your tribe and bringing people together and creating a sense of belonging.”

The workshops run for the first week of the July school holidays, with spaces limited to only 10 students per day. Small groups allow students to get as much support as they need and space for friendships to happen.

Foto iwi is run on a social enterprise model, so holiday programmes and workshops also allow Foto iwi to be able to work with students at local schools during the year, giving all local kids another way to share their story through photography. Loan cameras are available, if needed, and for anyone who is keen on creating videos of any workshop, Shayne says, “sign up, bring your skills”.

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Leftover funds for funeral of Louis Deval, 15, to go towards photography scholarship at school

Leftover funds donated towards the funeral service for a Whangaparāoa teenager who died over the weekend will go towards a photography scholarship.

Louis Duval, 15, died in a freak accident during the early hours of Sunday at home after he tripped, fell and hit his head on some tiles.

The teenager died in the arms of his family despite the best efforts of paramedics who tried to save his life.

The talented teen hoped to travel the world photographing wildlife.

Duval was survived by his father Stu, mother Lynette and older brother Pierre.

A keen mountain biker, Duval was also talented behind the lens of a camera and had ambitions to become a wildlife photographer.

More than $24,500 had been donated by around 440 contributors to a Givealittle page set up to collect donations towards the funeral service for Duval.

Duval’s funeral would be held at 11am on Thursday at the Whangaparāoa Baptist Church.

Any donation money spare from the funeral would go towards a photography scholarship at Whangaparāoa College, where Duval was a Year 11 student, and towards a mission project he was supporting in the Philippines.

Longtime family friend Molly Kirkbride set up the page on behalf of the Duval family and was astonished at all of the support.

“It’s gone nuts,” she told the Herald today. “This morning I woke up and it was on $20,000 and now it’s nearly $22,000 or $23,000.”

By 4pm, more than $24,500 had been donated to the Givealittle page.

The Duval family was heartbroken by the loss of their son, Kirkbride said, but the tight-knit Whangaparāoa community had rallied around them.

The teenager’s father, Stu, alerted Facebook friends on Sunday morning about Duval’s passing.

“It is with incredible sadness and a broken heart that Lynette and I share with you the sudden passing of our dearest Louis last night,” he said.

“He was greatly, immeasurably, loved and his 15 years with us were special beyond words. Go well my son, in God’s hands now.”

Kirkbride said she would remember Duval as a “bright and creative” person.

Elsewhere, tributes flooded social media since Duval’s death.

“He will be missed by so many,” shared a friend, while another described him as upbeat, funny and sarcastic.

Another described Duval as the “most amazing, kind, creative and wonderful young person you could imagine.”

NZherald